What Does Ferrous Mean?

Ferrous and nonferrous metals are used in endless industries for thousands of purposes. Many people wonder what the difference between ferrous metals and nonferrous metals, and why that difference means in terms of their use. If you are interested in learning more about ferrous metal and the types that exist, you are in the right place. Continue reading to do just that!

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Ferrous Metals Contain Iron

Simply put, ferrous metal is any metal that contains iron or steel. Things like construction scaffolding, automobiles, buildings, power tools, and more are made from ferrous metals. Carbon steel, stainless steel, cast iron, wrought iron, mild steel, and any other forms of steel and iron are examples of ferrous metals. Metal such as stainless steel is not entirely composed of iron and steel. It also contains nickel and chromium. In contrast, wrought iron is made of nearly 100 percent iron.

Ferrous metal is very strong and durable and even retains magnetic properties. This is why it is used to manufacture or construct things that can resist corrosion and remain strong and stable. It is used to make everything from skyscrapers to drill bits, and more. Large-scale piping, cars, trucks, yachts, planes, construction and farming equipment, motors, industrial containers, rail roads, and more are common large-scale commodities built from ferrous metals. Smaller items include everything from kitchen knives, to power tools, electrical appliances, and more.

Nonferrous Metal Do Not Contain Iron

Also simply put, nonferrous metal is metal that does not contain iron or steel compounds. Metals like copper, nickel, aluminum, brass, lead, tin, zinc, and more are all examples of nonferrous metals. Also, precious metals are nonferrous, such as gold, chromium, tungsten, silver, zirconium, mercury, cobalt, bismuth, cadmium, beryllium, and more.  Non-ferrous metals are used for their malleability and versatility.  They also have a higher resistance to rust and corrosion because they do not contain any iron compounds.  Jewelry, electrical wiring, canning, window frames, road signs, electrical fittings, pipe work, batteries, roofing, and millions of other items are made from nonferrous metal materials.

How to Identify Iron Content Using a Magnet

One of the easiest ways to determine if something contains ferrous metal is to hold a magnet to it. If the magnet sticks, it is made with ferrous metals like iron and steel. If the magnet does not stick, then it is made mostly or entirely of nonferrous metals like copper or aluminum. If the magnet pulls slightly but does not stick or stay, it is likely that the item is made from both ferrous and nonferrous metals.

Where to Sell Scrap Metal for Cash in Indiana

Call Garden City Iron & Metal at 1-888-586-5322 to sell scrap iron and metal in Indianapolis, Indiana. We pay cash on the spot for both ferrous and non-ferrous metals, as well as, junk cars, automotive parts, appliances, construction equipment, motorized farming equipment, and much more! There is simply no end to the metals we buy in Central Indiana! Get rid of your junk and make some fast cash at the same time. Call today to get a free quote.

Garden City Iron and Metal 1-888-586-5322
Garden City Iron and Metal 1-888-586-5322

The Difference Between Wrought Iron and Cast Iron

Many people assume that wrought iron and cast iron are interchangeable terms for early ironwork, or antique iron working. However, wrought iron and cast iron, although sharing the same mental material, are two different methods of working with iron. Continue reading to learn the basic differences between wrought iron and cast iron, as well as, how to sell your left over scrap iron for instant cash.

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Indianapolis Scrap Iron Buyers 1-888-586-5322

Wrought Versus Cast

Here are the basics: cast iron is melted, transferred to a custom mold, then left to cool and solidify. Wrought-iron, on the other hand, is heated, worked, and modified, and then allowed to cool and harden. For more details in their differences, take a look at the differences below.

Wrought Iron

Wrought iron is a crude alloy that is defined by its carbon content. Specifically, wrought iron is any iron that retains less than 0.8% carbon content. When the carbon content reaches 2.1%, it is cast iron. If it reaches beyond 4% carbon content, no longer cast iron, but something else. The top benefits of wrought iron include its toughness, malleability, ductility, corrosion-resistance, and ease of welding. It is a fact that the term “wrought” is derived from the past participle of the word “worked.” This is one-way you can remember the primary difference between wrought-iron mythology and cast iron methodology.

Cast Iron

The term “cast” in “cast iron” is meant to be a generic moniker for a long list of ambiguous iron alloys. You see, cast iron is a metal alloy, meaning it is not pure iron. Along with iron, it contains 2% to 4% carbon, along with smaller quantities of manganese and silicone. As mentioned, when the carbon content in metal exceeds 2.0 %, it is officially cast iron. It is even common to find certain metal impurities, such as sulfur or phosphorus, but in very small amounts.

Comparing the Two

When comparing cast iron to wrought iron, cast iron is harder, yet more brittle. It is also less pliable, meeting it is not possible to bend, stretch, or form. Although cast-iron is hard, it has low tensile strength, meaning it will break before it ever bends. On the other hand, cast-iron has notable compression strength. Compared to cast-iron, wrought iron is more ductile, so it’s softer and easily malleable. It can also be reheated over and over without losing any strength. In fact, it gets stronger every time it’s worked. It can also be formed into various shapes.

Where to Sell Left Over Iron and Scrap Metal in Indianapolis

Call Garden City Iron & Metal at 1-888-586-5322 to sell scrap metal in Indianapolis, Indiana. We pay cash on the spot for all metal and metal commodities, including sheet metal, piping, beams, vehicles, car parts, appliances, construction equipment, farming equipment, and much more! Collect all the scrap metal you can, and then sell it to us for the highest profit in town! Request a free estimate or information, today.

Garden City Iron and Metal 1-888-586-5322
Garden City Iron and Metal 1-888-586-5322

The Discerning Attributes of Ferrous and Non-Ferrous Metal

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Scrap Metal Recycling 1-888-586-5322

There are various types of metal found all around the world, but all metals can be placed into one of two categories: ferrous or non-ferrous. The most distinguishing difference between ferrous and non-ferrous metal is iron. Iron is among the most common chemical elements on the planet, and found primarily in the Earth’s crust. When metal contains iron, regardless of how little the content, it is considered a ferrous metal. In contrast, non-ferrous metals do not contain any iron content. An easy way to remember this rule is to remember that non-ferrous means non-iron.

So how do you tell the difference between a ferrous and non-ferrous metal?

The answer is a magnet! If the magnet sticks to the metal, the metal contains iron, which would make it ferrous. You see, iron is a magnetic metal, so if a magnetic sticks, it must contain a sufficient amount of iron content. In some cases, the concentration of iron is too weak to attract a magnet, so additional equipment would be necessary in determining its true composition. Look below to learn some examples of ferrous and non-ferrous metals and their common applications.

Ferrous Metals

Wrought Iron: Composition is virtually 100% iron content. Common applications include fencing and ornamental gates.

Cast Iron: This strong but brittle metal contains mostly iron, but also contains anywhere from 2 to 6% carbon. It is commonly used to make engine blocks and sewer covers.

Mild Steel: Mild steel has a mostly iron composition, but also contains between 0.1 to 0.3% of carbon. Its primary application is engineering, but also non-specialized metal products manufacturing.

Carbon Steel: Iron metal containing 0.6 to 1.4% carbon content. It is commonly used to make metal cutting tools and tool parts, like drill bits and bushings.

Stainless Steel: A popular finish for home appliances, stainless steel contains iron, nickel, and chromium. Because it is stain and corrosion-resistant, it is commonly used to make surgical instruments and cutlery.

Non-Ferrous Metals

Copper: A naturally-occurring element, copper contains no iron content. Because of its electricity and heat-transfer attributes, it is commonly used to make electrical wiring, tubing, and plumbing pipes.

Aluminum: Aluminum contains manganese, copper, and aluminum content. It is highly malleable and lightweight, so it is commonly used in the aircraft manufacturing industry, but also for kitchenware, window frames, and more.

Lead: Also a naturally-occurring element, lead is a soft, but heavy, metal. It is primarily used to make batteries, roofing materials, and pipework.

Brass: Brass is made up of mostly copper, but contains up t0 35% zinc as well. It is commonly used to make ornamental commodities and electrical fittings.

Recycle Your Scrap Metal for Cash

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Garden City Iron and Metal 812-343-5073

Call Garden City Iron & Metal at 1-888-586-5322 to recycle scrap metal and junk metal commodities in Central and Southern Indiana. We pay cash on the spot for both ferrous and non-ferrous metals, as well as, junk cars, automotive parts, appliances, construction equipment, motorized farming equipment, and much more! Get rid of your junk and make some fast cash at the same time.